Hidden Glensheen

Hidden Glensheen – Edward’s Room

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Edward Congdon (everyone called him Ned) was in his 20s when the Glensheen was finally ready to live in. And in fact, Ned moved in before anyone else – he slept in his room for several nights before anyone else moved in. Here is his room:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

And here’s the historical view of his room (at night, for some reason):

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

The doorknob and escutcheon is a beautiful hammered copper:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

The light switch has a copper faceplate with brass screws:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

I’m a fan of the wallpaper pattern underneath the faceplate.

This was Ned’s bed. There’s not an immediate Celtic connection in either Chester’s or Clara’s family, so the Celtic cross on the bed is probably just a design element, vs. a nod to familiar roots:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Ned’s room is full of fumed oak (you expose wood to ammonia fumes, which draws out the grain), and this cabinet is a nice example:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

 

This coat rack is simple but authoritative in its design. Do you notice that ‘hammered copper’ theme continued? No, it’s not hammered copper, but it does continue the appearance of a theme:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

There are a few bookshelves in Ned’s room. “This Simian World” caught my eye here. It was written in 1920 by Clarence Day. Here’s a passage from it: “It is possible that our race may be an accident in a meaningless universe living its brief life, uncared for on this dark, cooling star.” Rather dark, eh?

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

This just looks like an enjoyable selection all around:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

If I had to guess, I’d say this was a photograph of Ned and Walter (Robert was born several years later):

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Here is Ned’s desk:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Ned was, by all accounts, the family photographer, and he has an impressive collection of old cameras and photographic equipment. This is an old Eastman Kodak camera:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Here’s that camera from the side. You can see how it collapses into its own carrying case:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Here’s a ‘Kodak Vest Pocket Camera.’ You can see the eight blades in the aperture (the hole through which the light goes in):

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

This #8 Portrait Attachment is a small lens that fits onto the Kodak Vest Pocket Camera (as seen above):

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

This is a movie camera. I tried to show both sides, by focusing the back side of the movie camera’s reflection in the mirror:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Here’s an little Brownie camera. I’m sure many of you had Brownies – there were all the rage for many years. You can see how the years have started to cause the glass to become pitted:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

“C. B. Congdon” would refer to Clara Bannister Congdon, so apparently Clara was taking photos as well!

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

This is in Ned’s darkroom (between his bedroom and the Infirmary bathroom). Do you suppose the ‘Zimmerman Brothers’ were relatives of Robert Zimmerman (better known as Bob Dylan)? Today, 330 W Superior Street would have been where the Providence Building is located. The Providence Building was built well before Glensheen, so perhaps the Zimmerman Brothers Eastman Kodak Company was located inside the Providence Building:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

These are very old rolls of film :

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Transparent oil colors would have been used to hand-color prints:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

And these little devices were used for cutting negatives smoothly:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Leaving the darkroom, this lamp caught my eye just because of its blooming flower leaf base:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

This is a detail from Ned’s fireplace, which, similar to the infirmary, uses Grueby Faience Company tiles (and hammered copper):

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

And this is a fun little find – it’s a hockey stick, apparently sold by the Northern Hardware Company:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from Edward's Room

Later, I’ll be sharing a photo of one of the head gardener’s sons, playing hockey on the frozen Tischer Creek, with the mansion in the background. Perhaps he was using this very stick!

Next room: The Boy’s Lounge
Previous room: Infirmary

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