Hidden Glensheen

Hidden Glensheen – Infirmary

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The infirmary is on the 3rd floor, and this was the place you went when you were sick. Whether you were ‘the help’ or family, if you were sick, this is where you went to recover:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Here’s  a view looking into the room. It does look sunny and inviting, doesn’t it?

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Above the fireplace is a custom Grueby Faience Company tile scene:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

The Grueby Faience (‘faience’ means earthenware) Company is still around today, and they actually visited Glensheen a few years ago. They were quite pleased to find examples of their early work.

In the corner of the Infirmary is a little bookshelf that hinges out. We looked behind the bookcase, hopeful that we’d find some fun treasures, but there was nothing behind. Apparently, this design ‘met you in bed,’ and allowed you to stay in bed and select new books without having to get up:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Here’s the spinning wheel that’s currently in the corner. I found an old photograph that had this spinning wheel down in the basement (you’ll see that when we get to the basement). It kind of makes you wonder how the staff decides where to put all the various items.

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Near the doorway is a ‘John Chatillon & Sons’ scale. Today, the AMETEK Sensors, Test & Calibration company has acquired the John Chatillon & Sons company, but they are still in existence (sort of). Capacity 300 lbs:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Here’s an old wheelchair with a sweet cane back and seat. Notice how there’s only a single wheel in back:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

This duffel bag belonged to Bob Wyness when he was in the Air Force. Bob was the son of Glensheen’s first gardener, eventually taking over from his father and working as the Head Gardener until his retirement in 1985.

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Bob lived in the Gardener’s Cottage for 83 years.

I haven’t shared a photo of a thermostat yet, but they all look, to varying degrees, like this one:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Blood heat is 98°F, Summer heat is 76°F, and ‘Temperate’ is 56°F.

I’m going to include the bathroom that’s adjacent to the infirmary, since there’s not enough in it to warrant its own page.

The showers at Glensheen were pretty amazing. They had 13 heads, and the controls allowed for precise temperature measuring. It was difficult to make a photograph that did a good job of showing what the shower would look like if you were entering it:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

This is the shower control. The left knob controls the overhead shower, and ‘Needle’ refers to what was known as a ‘liver shower.’ The liver shower sprayed your midsection, and was supposed to have health benefits. You can also see a knob at the bottom for shampoo. It’s gone now, but there was a rubber hose that you could use to spray shampoo water into your hair:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Here are the ‘Shower’ and ‘Needle’ knobs:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

 

This is the tub water supply and drain stop.

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

I don’t know, but I like to imagine that the plumbers reading this will appreciate that we’ve included some shots just for them.

And true to the nature of this ‘Hidden Glensheen’ project, we found the following items in one of the medicine chests:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Infirmary

Several atomizers, bedpans, a brace, and other items used in recuperation.

Next room: Edward’s Room (Coming Soon)
Previous room: Helen’s Room

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