Hidden Glensheen

Hidden Glensheen – Maid’s Room

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This room has different names, depending on which resource you’re reviewing. The original blueprints described it as ‘Servant’s Room,’ while the book “Glensheen,” by Tony Dierckens, names this room the “Servant’s Quarters.” The floor plans that Glensheen staff currently use describe it as the “Maid’s Room,’ which is the document I’ve been using.

The Maid’s Room is usually only viewable from behind a barrier at the doorway. As you can see, it’s almost Spartan, at least when compared to the rest of the mansion:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

The dressers are made from a beautiful birdseye maple, and the drawer pulls have a lion’s head, although it’s a different styled lion from any other in the house:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

This is definitely my favorite piece in this room:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

It’s an old Wilcox and Gibbs sewing machine from the late 1800s.

The foot treadle is a work of art, with a stylized ‘W’ that would fit your feet just so:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

The treadle is connected to the flywheel:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

And the flywheel is connected to a leather belt that goes up through the cabinet to the sewing machine and powers the needle:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

We found this little pillow/pin cushion and a small wooden cylinder full of extra needles:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

Here’s the fabric plate of the sewing machine, along with patent information and a handy conversion guide:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

And here’s the machine in full:

Historic Hidden Glensheen photo from the Maid's Room

I don’t know about you, but seeing a sewing machine like this makes me a little nostalgic for some early industrial design. Admittedly, having exposed belts was definitely unsafe, but the simple aesthetic is appealing.

 

Next room: Helen’s Room
Previous room: Linen Closet

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