Hidden Glensheen

Hidden Glensheen – Third Floor Hallway and Storage

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The third floor hallway has artwork filling the walls, and I’ll share a few of the pieces that liked before moving into the storage room.

Much (but not all) of the artwork in Glensheen has information about it in the tour guide handbook. This piece by Eliza Barchus was not included, but fortunately, her signature at the bottom was enough:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Barchus really perfected the ‘pastoral mountain scene,’ and if you look up her work, you’ll see that much of it is very similar. Even so, she won a great amount of acclaim and awards for her work.

This one has a stamp in the lower right corner that says “Copyright 1908, The R.H. Bressler Co.” Beyond that, I can’t find any information about this piece,

  Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography 

I still it for its ethereal quality.

This painting is by Camillo Gioja Barbera, an Italian painter. I couldn’t find the name of this piece, but it’s very much in the style of his other work:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This is a small painting in the hall, and easy to miss. There’s no signature, so it will probably never be “important,” but the quality of light in this painting really draws me in:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

In several places, built right into the floor are these little round things:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

These are the intakes for the central vacuum system (we’ll see the other end of that in the basement).

This is the cedar closet, which is full of clothes, rugs, and other things made from fabric:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

We did not delve too deeply here, other than to find these bear fur winter gloves:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Across the hall from the cedar closet is the 3rd floor storage closet. The lights are usually out, and it’s very easy to miss, but it is stuffed to the gills. When you think about it, Glensheen doesn’t actually have that much in any single room. It’s a little bit sterile, especially when compared to pretty much anyone’s house you might visit today. Sure, having butlers and maids would certainly help, but I think a larger part of the reason is that a LOT of the miscellany of Glensheen is tucked away. We rooted through the storage room and pulled out a few interesting things. 

For example, we found this 1908 globe:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

And this interesting and slightly macabre inkpot:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Here it is with the lid on top of the skull opened:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

And here it is with the lid closed, from the backside:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

You can see where the ink spilled a bit.

We found a Gillette safety razor:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

And this was a little monogrammed pouch with various medicines and treatments:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This was a pretty elaborate case for a single cigar:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Just kidding! When you open the cigar, it become this fan:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Here’s a Chinese ashtray with some Chinese ‘square holed money’ (that’s a literal translation, apparently!):

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Here’s a traveling inkpot:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

When you open the first lid, there’s a sealed lid below that:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

And finally, when you open that, you get to the actual ink:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This is a tortoise shell letter opener with a bird claw handle:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

An adjustable magnifying glass:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This beautiful, hand-painted lamp is no longer able to stand on its own (it’s leaning against the wall in this picture):

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Oh, and then the keys. This is the pile of keys that can actually be used:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

And here is a little portion of the keys to which no lock can be found:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

My ‘mystery key drawer’ doesn’t have quite this many.

More photographic equipment:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

I didn’t realize that Clara was quite deaf. This is a collection of some of the various hearing aids she used over the years:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This is a small hand-painted portrait of Chester:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This is a mold that was used to create some of the various plaster molding along the ceilings in several of the different rooms:

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

Have you ever used a ‘Thread-a Matic’?

Hidden Glensheen Mansion Photo by Bryan French Photography

This punch bowl and matching glasses look like they were dipped in pewter or silver:

Hidden Glensheen Third Floor Hallway and Storage Photo by Bryan French Photography

This wicker stool is actually amazing. It has little wicker teacups and wicker saucers, and it’s being supported (barely) by four wicker legs:

Hidden Glensheen Third Floor Hallway and Storage Photo by Bryan French Photography

All of these baskets were most likely made by hand, because that’s how everything was done back then:

Hidden Glensheen Third Floor Hallway and Storage Photo by Bryan French Photography

This was a delightful find – this painting of these two women has been removed from its frame, and was just sitting out, collecting dust. We carefully dusted it off and were quite delighted at how clear it still is:

Hidden Glensheen Third Floor Hallway and Storage Photo by Bryan French Photography

It has no signature, so we don’t know more about it than what we can see here.

Next Room: The Attic
Previous Room: Alfred’s Room

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