Carriage House Garage

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The Carriage House had this garage which was used to service the various cars they had over the years. In the foreground you can see the covered pit, where mechanics could stand while working on a vehicle above them:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

As you can see, the garage is mostly empty, but we did find a few yard implements, including broken hoes, edgers and watering cans:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

At first glance, this brick says ‘Tiffany,’ but then you can see that the ‘N’ is reversed. I found one other example of this, but other than having come from Illinois, there wasn’t really any good information about it:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

This postal scale was made by the Pelouze Manufacturing Company. Today, Pelouze has been folded into the Rubbermaid company, but they still use the Pelouze name for their scales:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

This Bowser Oil Storage System was something you’d normally find at a service station, but the Congdons had one:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

The Congdons also owned an electric car for a while. Electric car technology at the turn of the century promised 100 miles of travel before needing a recharge. Sound familiar? One is left to wonder how far along electric car technology might have come if we would have kept using them. This device in the corner of the garage is the charging mechanism for the electric car:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

This knob was part of the electric car charging assembly. It’s hard to read, but it says ‘Sangamo.’

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

What’s especially surprising is that this company is using the same logo today. Here it is:

Sangamo's Logo

Isn’t that surprising? Apparently now, the company has moved into biomedical research.

I’m glad a took a photo of this name plate that described the Mercury Arc Rectifier. I wasn’t familiar with mercury arc rectifiers – I was just impressed that this was made by General Electric, which was a relatively young company (they were founded in 1892).

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

But once I looked up what a mercury arc rectifier actually was, I am super impressed! This is the very small mercury arc rectifier that converted alternating current into the direct current that could charge the electric car’s batteries:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

That bulb had a pool of mercury in the bottom which helped convert the electricity to D/C. Here’s a pretty good explanation of the process:

It’s fun to learn new things like that!

This is a drain pipe, right next to the pit cover. It also shows the lovely decorative tile that covered the floor:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

And finally, we found a pair of ice traction devices in a drawer. You might have YakTrax, but back then, they had hinged steel plates with the corners folded down, and that was strapped to your boots:

Hidden Glensheen Photo of Carriage House Garage by Bryan French Photography

Next: Carriage House – Carriages and Sleighs (stay tuned!)

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